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General guitar stuff, not yet identified or sorted:

Information and members comments pulled from archived TexasFlood mailing list digests.

Stevie Ray's Amp Tech was Steve Wilson. Steve also maintained Double Trouble members Reese Wynans keyboards and Tommy Shannon's bass rig.

 

His Holy Grail early-on was to get a Dumble amp, which he did later (around 1986, if I remember correctly). He used so many amps, though, it's hard to tell what was used on what song (hey, what an idea for a book! "Stevie Ray - the Complete Studio Companion"). His sound did change considerably through the years - early sound primarily Fender-like, later sound more distorted. His early gear had Fender Supers, Twins, and a Vibroverb. Later gear added Marshalls, the Dumble, and even Gibsons. Setup varied night-to-night, but he always had Fenders in there somewhere. He blew them up constantly!

 

I know Stevie, at the time of his death, had around 30 or 35 guitars in various stages of repair. I just received a video of Stevie giving an interview in Japan in 1985 where he played a Gibson Flying V. I don't know if that was his, but given his Albert King adulation I'm sure it was.

 

There are a couple of other guitar questions I've been meaning to ask about. Where did the white Strat with the lefty neck come from, the one he always played on "Superstition" and a lot of times "Willie the Wimp?" It isn't "Charley," since it has Fender-style single coil pickups and not the Danelectros. And for a time he rarely played the "Charley" Strat, then suddenly he picked it up again. Jimmie played "Charley" at the George Bush Inaugural ball.

 

Stevie's Fenders were all stock, I think, so it went straight from shelf to stage. The butterscotch one was a '60 or '61, with a right-handed tremolo. However, I don't have definite word on which was "Lenny." (Oh, and the red one was a '60 with a righty trem.)

 

I just saw the Rock Influences video for the first time recently, and Stevie was playing a guitar I've never seen. It might have been 'Red' but I don't think it had the Hendrix lefty neck and it had what looked like a black pickguard. Stevie used it on Come On (Part III). Anybody know if this was an additional guitar in Stevie's collection?

 

Stevie, at the time of his death, had around 30 or 35 guitars in various stages of repair. I just received a video of Stevie giving an interview in Japan in 1985 where he played a Gibson Flying V. I don't know if that was his, but given his Albert King adulation I'm sure it was.

 

I have not seen the video you mentioned, so I'm not sure about that guitar. Could have been Red...did it have a worn area where his right arm would have rubbed against the guitar body? If so, was that worn area black? Red originally had a right-handed, rosewood neck. I *think* it was late 1986 when Stevie put a lefty neck on Red. I know in February, 1987 it was a lefty.

 

There are a couple of other guitar questions I've been meaning to ask about. Where did the white Strat with the lefty neck come from, the one he always played on "Superstition" and a lot of times "Willie the Wimp?" It isn't "Charley," since it has Fender-style single coil pickups and not the Danelectros. And for a time he rarely played the "Charley" Strat, then suddenly he picked it up again. Jimmie played "Charley" at the George Bush Inaugural ball.

 

I have heard 2 different reasons SRV tuned to Eb. One reason the songs are a bit easier to sing in the lower tuning and the other reason is Jimi Hendrix tuned to Eb and we all know how much SRV liked Jimi! a couple more reasons is that, its much easier to get those huge bends that Stevie is so known for. And it also made the song little thicker, probably going back the singing thing.

 

I always thought that the lower tuning was simply to allow Stevie to get more bending capabilities. Also, coupled with the fact that he used pretty heavy strings, would keep him from breaking them every 5 minutes.

 

On In The Beginning SRV tuned to E so this dropped tuning was something he adopted later on. Believe it or not the heaver gauge strings still put as much pressure on the neck as the normal gauge strings do even tuned down because of the heaver gauge.

 

On a Strat you need a bit higher action because of the radius of the neck. I have looked on several SRV videos and old #1 had pretty high action and Lenny (The red strat he uses on Lenny and Riveria Paradise) has even higher action. He might use heaver gauge strings on Lenny cause he didn't bend the strings on it as much as he did on #1. Just some thoughts.

 

Stevie had Finger-ease sprayed on the necks of his guitars, often during the performance itself (especially during the summer when sweat makes the hands slippery). Also, his guitar techs reported in several mag's that his strings were changed regularly, every show in fact. In fact, on later tours, the neck was cleaned and etc. between shows.

 

The issue was Sept. 87 and Stevies pick is purple (what else!!) D-Addario Delrins Heavy .043", 1.10 mm. I love those Dunlop Tortex purple 1.14mm picks, like many other flooders :-)

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